I'm Raegan. I post/reblog fish stuff, puns, personal stuff and whatever. Third-wave critical, Male rights advocate sympathizer. Proper citations are very important to me.

Full marriage equality is very important to me.

Current obsessions: garter snakes, leopard geckos, solitaire, taxonomy.

Fishkeeping is basically my whole life.

#fresh4lyfe

I run way too many blogs.

 

zebablah:

is this snake fucking serious 
like was that actually fucking necessary 

zebablah:

is this snake fucking serious 

like was that actually fucking necessary 

2lovely4lela:

fishmostly:

pondweed:

Anubias nana petite! PetiTE!!!

So if that is petite, is mine like, micro?


it just hasn’t grown up yet. :)

I’ve had that plantlet for like 6 months?

2lovely4lela:

fishmostly:

pondweed:

Anubias nana petite! PetiTE!!!

So if that is petite, is mine like, micro?

it just hasn’t grown up yet. :)

I’ve had that plantlet for like 6 months?

Sister: how long were we gone on our walk?

Me: *looks around nervously* at least three pages of “tumblr gets deep” by pleatedjeans?

to anyone not eating dinner with me:

today is nacho day

pondweed:

Anubias nana petite! PetiTE!!!

So if that is petite, is mine like, micro?

pondweed:

Anubias nana petite! PetiTE!!!

So if that is petite, is mine like, micro?

So I wanted to go to SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry once upon a time and I just heard about the massive storm system in that area and I’M SO JEALOUS GDI WHY DIDN’T I CHOOSE THAT SCHOOL

rhamphotheca:

Fish Out of Water Learn to Walk

Around 400 million years ago, fish left the water and started to evolve into land-loving creatures. But how did the transition happen? A new and unusual experiment could shed some light on the kinds of changes that enabled fins to become limbs. Researchers took a fish species known to be able to walk on its fins from time to time, and raised it on land. Watch the fish promenade in this Nature Video.

Read the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13708

Read the News & Views: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13743

thatfishchick:

izzy-the-fish-girl:

thatfishchick:

Source : http://www.tickld.com/funny/t/975634
Pics Source : http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/106/9/5/Laughing_Fish_by_Evelynism.jpg
……I know, I know. It’s terrible. It’s okay if you’re making the grumpy squirrelfish face on the bottom.
On a fun side note, marine scientists and biologists DO use fish scales to tell fun stuff about a fish, but not for mass. Instead, they use them for what’s called the “hard part method” to determine age. Scales develop rings from periods of growth like rings in a tree trunk. Other parts of the body such as the vertebrae and the otoliths - earbones - do this as well, but they require killing and dissecting the fish to sample. We can sample scales without killing the fish. A group of scales is sampled from behind the pectoral fins (where they are most protected), counted and averaged (to accommodate for scales which may be newer due to a scrape or injury).
Other fun side note : if you’re not on tickld.com…… you should be.

Aging fish by scales is actually kinda fun. You count the dark growth rings like you would on a tree (those are laid down during the winter). Otoliths are also fun and easier (in my experience) but require dissection to get to. I did some aging work in undergrad. You take a photo of the body part under a microscope and then put it up on a projector. These were some of the photos I took.

An otolith. This one came from a red breasted sunfish. We estimated his age at time of death as 2 years.

This is the scale of a rock bass. We estimated his age as 2. You can see how it’s easier to tell the age of a fish from the otolith. But often times we don’t want to kill the fish, so we use the scales.

 I love you for reblogging with these pics.

thatfishchick:

izzy-the-fish-girl:

thatfishchick:

Source : http://www.tickld.com/funny/t/975634

Pics Source : http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/106/9/5/Laughing_Fish_by_Evelynism.jpg

……I know, I know. It’s terrible. It’s okay if you’re making the grumpy squirrelfish face on the bottom.

On a fun side note, marine scientists and biologists DO use fish scales to tell fun stuff about a fish, but not for mass. Instead, they use them for what’s called the “hard part method” to determine age. Scales develop rings from periods of growth like rings in a tree trunk. Other parts of the body such as the vertebrae and the otoliths - earbones - do this as well, but they require killing and dissecting the fish to sample. We can sample scales without killing the fish. A group of scales is sampled from behind the pectoral fins (where they are most protected), counted and averaged (to accommodate for scales which may be newer due to a scrape or injury).

Other fun side note : if you’re not on tickld.com…… you should be.

Aging fish by scales is actually kinda fun. You count the dark growth rings like you would on a tree (those are laid down during the winter). Otoliths are also fun and easier (in my experience) but require dissection to get to. I did some aging work in undergrad. You take a photo of the body part under a microscope and then put it up on a projector. These were some of the photos I took.

An otolith. This one came from a red breasted sunfish. We estimated his age at time of death as 2 years.

This is the scale of a rock bass. We estimated his age as 2. You can see how it’s easier to tell the age of a fish from the otolith. But often times we don’t want to kill the fish, so we use the scales.

 I love you for reblogging with these pics.

izzy-the-fish-girl:

Above the water! Below the water! This was part of their biomes of NC exhibit. That one little killifish was the only bugger in the whole exhibit that stood still enough for me!

Anonymous asked
i think you said something about having a marimo once or twice? would you mind explaining how/why you got it, and how the process of taking care of it and having it has been? (' : i'm curious. either way, thank you for your time, and i hope you have a good day!

I got it from PetCo because I was new to fishkeeping and heard it was easy. Taking care of it has been as follows:

  • plop it in the tank
  • move it out of the way when I’m doing water changes
  • ignore

I’m not really a marimo person, I much prefer my higher-order plants. Sorry if this isn’t the detailed answer you wanted.